Posted by: Kath Usitalo | March 9, 2012

Friday Freebie: Keweenaw Adventure Guide

A calm Lake Superior at dusk from Brockway Mountain at the tip of the Keweenaw

Did yesterday’s post with the link to the amazing Aurora Over Lake Superior video whet your appetite for more Yooper magic?

Start planning a visit to the northernmost reaches of the Upper Peninsula with a free copy of the Keweenaw Adventure Guide from the Keweenaw Peninsula Convention & Visitors Bureau.

The 60-page pocket-sized booklet is crammed with information on places to eat, shop, stay and see, and seasonal activities on the finger of land that juts into Lake Superior.

Waterfalls, lighthouses, museums, picnic spots—it’s a lot of material to fit in those narrow pages and the descriptive print gets mighty tiny. I believe Keweenaw is a Native American word for “fine print” and it would be a nice touch if this guide came with a magnifying glass.

Of course, most folks who request an “Adventure Guide” (those who go to the Keweenaw for the epic mountain biking, scuba diving, sea kayaking and extreme downhill skiing) can probably read the fine print from 20 paces.

The Keweenaw Adventure Guide is also available online; I checked it out and was able to zoom in and learn:

– The Audubon Society has reported 321 species of birds on the Keweenaw

– At one time the population of the Keweenaw reached nearly 100,000

Keweenaw Peninsula, portage waterway at its base

– Michigan House Cafe & Brew Pub in Calumet is the northernmost brew pub in the state

– There are 21 cemeteries on the Keweenaw; many date to the 1840s

– You can stay in one of 10 guest rooms at the 1908 Laurium Manor Inn, a 13,000-square foot copper baron’s mansion with 45 rooms

– Paddlers can follow the Keweenaw Water Trail for over 100 miles to circumnavigate the “Copper Island,” another name for the land surrounded by Lake Superior and the waterway at its base, known as the portage. Okay, so Keweenaw is the Ojibway language word for portage. I’ll get my own magnifying glass.

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